Gheymeh Polo Oven Baked Salmon with Cream Sauce
Feb 10

Its been a long time since I have had this Khoresht, and I felt it was time to make it and share the recipe! If you love eggplants and you love khoresht…then you should definitely try Khoresht-e Bademjan!
Khoresht-e Bademjan on top of plain rice and voila you will have a perfect meal :D

Khoresht e Bademjan

Khoresht e Bademjan


Ingredients (approximately 6 people):
1 lb (approximately 500 grams) stew meat — lamb or beef
6 small and narrow eggplants or 2 medium/large eggplants
3 - 4 tablespoons chopped onions
1 tablespoon tomato paste
2-3 tablespoons lemon juice
oil
salt and pepper
turmeric

Directions:
Cut the meat up into pieces (if its not already) and wash the meat. In a large pot heat up a small amount of oil to saute the onions in. Once the onions begin turning a golden color add the meat to it and stir around for a bit. Add salt, pepper, and turmeric to the meat and stir. Add 3 - 4 cups of water to the pot, tomato paste, and lemon juice then allow the contents to cook (place the lid on the pot and set burner to medium heat).

While the stew is cooking you can prepare the eggplants. If you are using narrow and small eggplants peel the skin and then put a slice through the eggplant (lengthwise), rinse the eggplants, and add salt to each. If you are using larger eggplants peel the skin and chop the eggplant (lengthwise) into a few pieces, rinse, add salt to each piece. Heat up some oil in a frying pan and fry the eggplants until a golden brown color. Note: eggplants do absorb a lot of oil, so if you prefer to bake them that may be a good option and a bit healthier.

When the Khoresht has thickened and most of the water is gone (should only have about 1 cup of water remaining) you will place the eggplants on top of the khoresht. Allow the Khoresht-e Bademjan to cook an additional 15 - 20 minutes for the eggplants to cook with the stew a bit.

Serve with plain rice and any other side dishes (salad, mast, etc.)…and as always enjoy :)

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10 Responses to “Khoresht-e Bademjan (Eggplant Stew)”

  1. Nellie says:

    Hi!
    I have been trying for a few months to get the hang of this recipe - it’s my favorite! I cannot for the love of God figure out why my stew just doesn’t taste “persian” - what am I missing? I am obviously not persian, but I figured if I use the correct ingredients, I should be OK! I do however use chicken instead of beef - we don’t really eat red meat anymore… could that be the difference? Thank you, N

    • Nellie, I think using chicken will change the flavor, but as long as you are using all the other ingredients and leaving the stew on the stove long enough to cook throughly you should still get a somewhat similar stew.

  2. hassan says:

    Nellie,
    I would recommend you use few dried lime if you can get them - they need to be piecred before going into the pan -

  3. Nellie says:

    I have the final results after so many days! It was all about patience and waiting for each step to complete. I was cooking too fast! Thank you for all your tips, now I can say “I made this” and actually be proud. I still love Khoresht-e Bademjan even after all my failures!
    Love your blog, thank you for posting!

  4. Trisa says:

    I just made this today in a crock pot and the texture turned out perfect. I did not have to fry or bake the eggplant (no added oil) I just put it in at the same time as the meat that I did brown. it was wonderful! I did add quite a bit of fresh garlic though.

  5. Emily says:

    Is there a way to cook this in a crockpot?

    • I am pretty sure you can cook it in a crock pot. I just havent tried that yet. Obviously you may want to add the egg plants a little later than the rest of the ingredients, but in general it should still come out great.

  6. reye says:

    not tasting Persian enough? — try instead of fresh lemon juice use limon amoni (dried lemons) and then add 2 pinches of advieh. you will find both in Iranian grocery stores. you will want to pierce the dried lemon several times before you add to the stew.

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